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This Week on Earth: May 18-23

By Jamie Schmid and Jamie Leventhal

McDonald’s Fish: Caught by Unsustainable Practices?

Although McDonald’s may claim its fish products are sustainable, a new leaked document casts doubt.

According to a exposed New Zealand government memo, bad fishing practices in the country’s waters are threatening one of the rarest dolphins in the world. Additionally, the exposed document showed a major cover-up of illegal practices like the dumping of old fish back into the waters, says BBC.

McDonald’s claims to get 8 percent of its fish supply from New Zealand. Given this is a substantial percent, many organizations are calling for a boycott of McDonald’s fish products. However, McDonald’s, which works with the Marine Steward Council, claims it followed the advice of this organization and denies wrongdoing.
So far, the New Zealand government has backed McDonald’s. Only time will tell what actions McDonald’s, the public, and the New Zealand government will take.

Shark Feeding Frenzy in Australia
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
An Australian tourism company spotted this incredible scene on Monday- dozens of tiger sharks feasting on a whale carcass.
 

Not So Sweet Spill: Molasses in the El Salvador River

According to The Washington Post, more than 900,000 gallons of molasses spilled into an El Salvador river that borders Guatemala.

This vast amount of molasses has damaged wildlife and ruined the river water. Molasses depletes water of oxygen and kills marine plants and animals. Additionally, it makes the water unsafe to drink of the local communities.

A similar spill in 2013 killed 26,000 marine animals in Honolulu. The devastation that molasses has on water ecosystem only rivals that of an oil spill.
The Environmental Ministry in El Salvador announced a three month emergency clean-up over 48 miles of the country, said The Washington Post. Hopefully, the river will be able to recover from this sticky situation.

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